Joseph Schubach Jewelers Blog

Broaching the Topic of Brooches

February 4, 2015

Brooches…not just your mother’s jewelry anymore. Check out some of these whimsical and eye-catching brooches we found at Vogue:

Broche Contraste de Camélia Chanel Joaillerie

Chanel Jewelry Contrasting Cammelia Brooch Contraste de Camélia white gold brooch, set with 95 brilliant cut diamonds with a combined 2.1 carats, 108 brilliant cut grey sapphires with a combined 4 carats, coral and onyx.

Broche Cartier panthère

Cartier panther brooch Platinum panther brooch, set with 535 diamonds, emerald eyes and 82 cabochon sapphires.

Broche Libellule Tiffany & Co.

Tiffany & Co. dragonfly brooch Gold Dragonfly brooch, set with diamonds and pink sapphires.

Broche Cindy Chao

Cindy Chao brooch Florale The Art Jewel 2015 Blacklabel Masterpiece n°5 white gold brooch, with two pearls, white diamonds (pear cut, oval cut, rose cut and brillant cut), yellow diamonds, brown diamonds, rhodolites and a 17.25 carat heart cut yellow diamond.

How to De-stuffacate your Wardrobe

February 3, 2015

Less is more. We’ve all heard it but rarely believe it. So we often overbuy and fill our closets and drawers to the brim. Then we moan, “But I have nothing to wear!”

This article points out that we often bury our best pieces with articles of clothing and jewelry that don’t mean as much to us, leaving us still feeling incomplete. So get de-stuffacting and uncover your favorite things!

Tip 1: Give up the guilt (if you have any)
It is not your fault and there is nothing wrong with you for buying so many things. From the earliest age, we are taught to be consumers – to look, buy, gather, hoard. Also, we get a very addictive chemical thrill every time we buy something – you know the feeling – even if the high doesn’t last.
Don’t worry though; handled right, you’ll get a similar feel-good feeling once you’ve lightened your wardrobe.

Tip 2: De-stuffocate with friends
Overturning millennia of training in gathering is hard. Just as we are hard-wired, as evolutionary psychologists believe, to love sweet, salty, fatty foods, so are we hard-wired to want and value material things. If you do it with a friend or friends it’ll make it so much easier. You know how it’s much easier to tell a girlfriend that something looks good or bad on them, than it is to know if something looks good or bad on you? Well, it’s the same with things in the wardrobe. Throughout, compare and compete: if your friend has got rid of 30 things, see if you can get rid of 31.

Tip 3: Minimalism in a minute: the bin-bag experiment
This is the extreme version for brave (or desperate) people seeking instant change. Ideally with a friend, put everything – yes, everything – in black bin bags so your wardrobes are bare. Then, each day, as you need something, take it back out again. This way, you’ll find out what you actually need.

Tip 4: Minimalism in a month
If that feels too much or too weird, start small. Find one thing you really don’t want, need, have never worn, and get rid of it. The next day, find two things. The next, three things, and so on, for a month. (It’s best to start this on the first of the month, so the number of things you throw out is the same as the day on the calendar.) This game was created by The Minimalists, Ryan Nicodemus and Joshua Fields Milburn. They call it the Minimalism Game.

Tip 5: You don’t need to be, or want to be, a minimalist to benefit
You can also de-stuffocate by going through your wardrobe, taking things out, and making piles:

(i) Things you’ve never worn – you can tell because the label’s still on, and they’re still shop pressed
(ii) Things you haven’t worn for a year
(iii) Things that are uncomfortable
(iv) Things you have worn but you’ve grown out of
(v) Things you hope to wear again some day

If you’re taking your time, put them in separate bags, and put them in the loft. If you haven’t missed them in a month – or three months time – they have to go (or else, what’s the point in keeping them?).

Read more at Telegraph!

 

 

 

Self-Defense Jewelry for the Street Savvy Woman

February 2, 2015

As we’re seeing more and more, jewelry is no longer just mere adornment in the 21st century. Not only is smart jewelry expanding out into the market but one woman decided that jewelry can also be a perfect weapon for self-defense. Read on.

Yasmine Mustafa´s company designs self-defense devices that can be worn as jewelry. ALEJANDRO A. ALVAREZ / STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

YASMINE MUSTAFA, 32, of University City, Philadelphia, and Anthony Gold, 49, of West Chester, co-founded Roar for Good, a University City firm aimed at empowering women with fashionable safety accessories and educational programs. The startup is part of DreamIt Athena, a female-focused entrepreneur program by DreamIt Ventures. I spoke with Mustafa, the CEO.

Q: How’d you come up with the idea for Roar?

A: A woman was raped a block from my apartment shortly after I came back from a trip to South America last year. The original idea was a wearable bracelet called the Macelet, which had Mace in it. I started talking to women and they were afraid of self-defense tools that an attacker might use against them. So I pivoted to a device that’s fashionable and easy to use that has a loud alarm and light to distract a would-be attacker and message friends and family.

Q: The startup money?

A: I conceived a functional prototype and found a hardware person, who’s still an adviser, to help me build it. We bootstrapped it and it cost about $5,000, and then we designed it.

Q: The biz model?

A: The device, which will be priced around $100, can be worn as a necklace, charm or key fob. It also has a magnet so you can put it on clothing. After we developed the prototype, some women wondered: Why not teach men not to attack women? We decided the wearable had a safety purpose but we could use part of our revenues to support nonprofits teaching nonviolence and promoting a culture of consent and respect.

Read more at Philly.com

 

Semi Custom Beverly K Engagement Ring

January 28, 2015

Semi customized Beverly K engagement ring. We took the shank of  style #102038 (8WR9011) and the prongs/head from style #102049 (8WR1235) and used the scroll engraving. The scroll hand engraving style can be done on any Beverly K engagement ring or wedding band.

Personalized Jewelry versus Custom Design

January 28, 2015

We often hear the term “personalized jewelry” in place of custom design. And while they fall loosely in the same category, there remains a difference. Custom design encompasses the whole process of creating a unique piece of jewelry, based on the customer’s needs. Personalized jewelry (at least in our eyes) is a design aspect of a piece of jewelry, like inscribing a ring with a message.

Here’s more on personalized jewelry:

 

Personalized jewelry can be a gift, but it also can be a statement that is timeless. Pieces can be customized with names, anniversary messages, dates, and phrases; all able to immortalize a moment or a lifetime bond between the receiver and the giver.

Here’s an example of personalized jewelry:
Reasons to Fall in Love with Personalized Jewelry

The Snitch Ring Goes Viral

January 26, 2015

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Isn’t it interesting, the whole process of virality? One little video quickly thrown up on YouTube could change the lives of those who posted it.

This Canadian jeweler experienced her 15 minutes of fame and then some when a ring she created caught fire on the Internet.

A Harry Potter–inspired ring went viral this week, sending shoppers flying to get a piece of the boy who lived—and its designer scrambling to fulfill orders from her small Kingston, Ontario, shop.

The Harry Potter Golden Snitch Ring comes in silver and gold with citrine, topaz, sapphire, and moissanite stone options. The stones are all honey-colored, and the band is texturized to resemble the Snitch’s famous wings (in Potter lore, the Snitch is one of three balls used to play the game Quidditch). The ring retails for $140, with an 18k white gold option that costs $1,120.

The ring is not official merchandise, as designer Miranda Scott clarifies on her site (and quite sweetly, actually) with a small poem:

At this ring, have a look
It was inspired by a book
If you’re a wizard or witch
You could use it to get hitched
In gold or silver it may be bought
but official merchandise, it is not
Allow 3-4 weeks for me to make it for you,
and J.K Rowling, if you’re reading this—please don’t sue.

 

Source: JCK Online

 

Jeweler and creator of Snitch Ring, Miranda Scott

Jeweler and creator of Snitch Ring, Miranda Scott

Princess Cut versus Round Brilliant Cut – Which One is for You?

January 21, 2015

In an ongoing efforts to educate (and inspire) our customers, we wanted to share this on-point description of the differences between a princess cut diamond versus a round brilliant cut. Read on, young whipper snapper!

 

Round diamonds have fewer facets and have circular symmetry. This makes round brilliants easier to design, cut and buy. Because of this, it has been possible to identify a range of angles for all the facets that optimise the light performance in a round.

Princess cuts have more facets, complicated angles, and less symmetry so what you’ll find is that even in the best princess cut, the light return at its edges and corners will be from the periphery and indicated as green on an ASET image.

What this means is that those areas will not be as bright as in a round where we have come to expect excellent edge-to-edge light performance. To compare a round to a princess is therefore comparing apples to oranges. Most official cut grading systems recognise this so princess cut diamonds are not graded on the same light performance scale as round diamonds.

Source: Prosumer Diamonds

main view of Princess Cut Engagement Ring With Channel Set Side Stones

Style 10001-5.5mm

Princess Cut Engagement Ring With Channel Set Side Stones

Engagement ring with 1/2ct t.w. channel set princess cut side stones. Fits a 5.5mm (1.05ct) princess cut center stone. (setting only, does not include center stone).

12 Inspiring (and Fun) Jewelry Tips

January 20, 2015

We see jewelry advice all of the time. But most of it is a pretty dry read. It’s always nice when a jewelry enthusiast (this time, Kirsten at Chicago’s Objet d’Envy) kicks it up a notch and offers creative, personally-infused pointers:

 

1. Cut up those layered gold chains.
The trend is moving toward ‘statement’ jewelry…that’s one standout necklace. Maybe it’s a dramatic medallion. Or a rich textured chain. If you have a long layered necklace, you can clip off some of the chains to turn it into a solitary piece. Use a wire cutter to cut near the clasp.

2. Less is more.
National Jeweler is recommending wearing bolder, larger pieces that are gem- and color-intensive. Check your jewelry collection for dramatic pieces. Then wear only one or 2 at a time: an oversized cocktail ring or dangly earrings. Whatever you choose, be sure they make an impression.

3. Look for versatile pieces.
A long necklace with a clasp can be worn several ways: as a single strand, as a triple strand choker, even as a bracelet.

4. Earn a compliment.
Pay attention to which piece of jewelry wins you a compliment. If your best friend, or a neighbor, or a stranger compliments you on a necklace, wear it more often. Jewelry is meant to enhance your look. It should catch someone’s attention. Same goes for what you like…if you find yourself giving a compliment, remember the piece. You can keep that in mind when shopping.

5. Buy what you love.
If you’re out shopping and something catches your eye instantly, respect that instinct. That first reaction is powerful. You really like a piece when you feel that emotion of “I want that.” If you love it, buy it. You’ll love it every time you put it on.

6. Try it on!
That being said, try on jewelry before purchasing. Be sure it’s comfortable. Is it the right length? Can you work the clasp? Does it stay on? That test run is important because if a piece doesn’t fit, you won’t wear it.

7. Stack your bracelets.
Women’s Wear Daily declared the bracelet THE piece for this season. Wear any style you like: thin, thick, cuff, beaded, silver, gold, bronze. Many trendsetters are stacking them. Often it’s the same style stacked together. Or it’s the same color in a few different styles. Or it’s a group in complimentary colors. Any way you want to wear a bracelet, you’ll be a fashionista.

8. Give up the watch!
If you don’t wear bracelets, your excuse is “but I wear a watch so I can’t wear a bracelet!” So wear bracelets on your other wrist. Or buy bracelets that are thin and will coordinate with your watch (same metal, same color). Better yet, give up your watch. You carry a cell phone…get the time from that. Or ask a handsome stranger for the time.

Read the rest here.

Thanks Kirsten!

 

 

 

Nicole Richie’s Free-spirited Fashion Advice to a Fan

January 19, 2015

Nicole Richie is a well-known and polished celebrity fashionista. So when she doled out fashion advice to fan Cara Hillie in this month’s Glamour magazine, we couldn’t help but spread her words of wisdom.

Her take on business attire?

Think business attire has to be boring? Not so, says Richie. “We’re in a different time now. You can’t be so serious about fashion,” she told Hille. “People really appreciate personal style. For work I throw on a lot of jewelry.” That’s a liberating perspective for Hille: “The people who surround me have always encouraged me to be a little bit more conservative on a job interview,” she admits. “Hearing Nicole say that makes me think about adding some color or an element that shows my personality.” Jewelry is an easy go-to; try a simple sheath dress with a statement necklace.

 

dos-donts-nicole-richie

 

Instructions for a Bad Day

January 14, 2015

If you’ve lost your sparkle, remember those words from spoken word poet Shane Koyczan. His piece, “Instructions for a Bad Day,” is read in the video above. The five-minute clip, created by Jon Goodgion from his own footage as well as pieces from Kevin Macdonald’s crowd-sourced documentary “Life In A Day,” makes for instant inspiration. – Huffington Post

 

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